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Pedagogical Blueprints: From Art School to Public Programme. A Symposium on Art Education (6, 13 and 20 May 2014)

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A new series of events explores the complex relationship between art and education in the UK since the 1960s. The three talks are organised by Elena Crippa (Curator, Tate Britain) and Nicoletta Lambertucci (Curator, DRAF).

All events are free.

Art School: Another History

Tuesday 6 May, 7–8.30pm

Prof. Catherine Elwes (artist and Professor of Moving Image Art, Chelsea College of Art), Prof. Lisa Tickner (Visiting Professor at The Courtauld Institute of Art) and Amy Tobin (Doctoral Researcher, University of York) discuss the history of the art school from a female perspective and the limits of an institution traditionally shaped and dominated by men.

A London Underground strike is expected on 6 May, but DRAF is easily reached by buses including numbers 24, 27, 29, 88, 134, 214, 253.

Museum Education and Public Programmes: From Object to Discourse

Tuesday 13 May, 7–8.30pm

Andrew Brighton (art critic and writer, formally Senior Curator Public Events, Tate Modern) and Victoria Walsh (Head of Curating Contemporary Art Programme, Royal College of Art) discuss their roles and experiences across art schools and public museums.

Imagining Art Education: The Artist Speaks

Tuesday 20 May, 7–8.30pm

Artists Aaron Angell, Celia Hempton and Cally Spooner imagine their own ideal public programmes through the lenses of their diverse artistic practices. Each will present personal responses to art and education, bringing their individual experiences to the discourse. The talks will be followed by a Q&A session.

 

Elena Crippa recently joined Tate Britain as Curator, Modern and Contemporary British Art. Previously she was co-Pathway Leader on the MRes Art: Exhibition Studies at Central Saint Martins, UAL.

 

Speakers:

Aaron Angell (b. 1987) is an artist living and working in London. He recently presented Woman expecting triplets returning home from the cinema: Aaron Angell and Jack Bilbo at SWG3, Glasgow, 2013, and is preparing a solo exhibition at Studio Voltaire, London in 2015. Recent group shows include pool: Kunst aus London at Kestnergesellschaft, Hanover; Die Marmory Show, Deborah Schamoni, Munich, 2014 and BRITISH BRITISH POLISH POLISH: 
Art from Europe’s Edges in the Long ’90s and Today, CSW Ujadowski Zamek, Warsaw, 2013.

Andrew Brighton was formally Senior Curator: Public Events at Tate Modern and has taught at the Royal College of Art, Goldsmiths’ College and the London Consortium. As well as art criticism, his publications include essays on cultural policy and the rise of management. He recently published ‘Valuing modernism: prejudices, markets, traditionalism, future-value, criticism, ethics’ in Critical Quarterly of which he is a contributing editor. He is currently working on a graphic novel with Catherine Brighton.

Catherine Elwes is a video artist, writer, teacher and curator who was active in the feminist art movement in the late 1970s. She co-curated the exhibitions Women’s Images of Men and About Time, 1980, ICA, London. Throughout the 1980s her work and writings continued to explore time–based media in general and feminist themes. Elwes is the author of Video Loupe (K.T. Press, 2000) and Video Art, a guided tour (I.B.Tauris, 2005) and her writings have appeared in books, journals, exhibition catalogues and periodicals. She is currently writing Installation and the Moving Image and Landscape and the Moving Image for Wallflower Press. Elwes is Professor of Moving Image Art at Chelsea College of Arts, University of the Arts London, and Founding Editor of the Moving Image Review & Art Journal (MIRAJ).

Celia Hempton (b. 1981) is an artist living and working in London. She graduated from Glasgow School of Art in 2003, from the Royal College of Art in 2007, and from 2008-2010 she studied at the British School at Rome. She has exhibited recently at the Kunstverein, Aachen, 2013; Lorcan O’Neill, Rome, 2014; Southard Reid, London, 2013 and Galerie Sultana, Paris, 2014. Group shows include OhWow Gallery, Los Angeles, 2014; Cell Project Space, 2014,  David Roberts Art Foundation, 2013, the Moving Museum, 2013  and Studio Voltaire, London, 2012. This summer she has been awarded residencies at Civitella Ranieri Foundation and Villa Lena Italy, and will be participating in the Fiorucci Art Trust’s Forget Amnesia in Stromboli.

Cally Spooner (b. 1983) is an artist living and working in London. Using theory, philosophers, current affairs and pop cultural figures as alibis to help her write, and casts of arguing characters to help her perform, Spooner produces plotless novellas, disjunctive theatre plays, looping monologues and musical arrangements to stage the movement and behaviour of speech. Recent work has explored how high performance economies have affected speaking as a live, undetermined event. Her work includes writing, film, live performance, and broadcasting. Spooner’s productions have been presented at Tate Modern, London, 2014; Performa 13, New York, 2013; Kunstverein Munich, 2014; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 2013; Kunsthal Charlottenburg, Copenhagen, 2013; KW Institute, Berlin, 2013; Wysing Art Centre, UK, 2012; Jeu De Paume, Paris, 2013; Serpentine Gallery, London, 2012. Cally Spooner is a recipient of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation Awards for Artists 2013.

Lisa Tickner is Visiting Professor at the Courtauld Institute of Art and Professor Emerita of Art History, Middlesex University. Her books include The Spectacle of Women: Imagery of the Suffrage Campaign, 1907-1914 (1988), Modern Life and Modern Subjects: British Art in the Early Twentieth Century(2000), and Hornsey 1968: The Art School Revolution (2008). She was an art student in the 1960s, and has taught art and art history students for more than forty years.

Amy Tobin in a researcher in the history of art department at the University of York. Her PhD, supervised by Dr Jo Applin, concentrates on the dynamics of collaboration between artists influenced by feminism in Britain and the United States in the 1970s and early 1980s.

Victoria Walsh is Head of the Curating Contemporary Art Programme at the Royal College of Art. Previously she was Head of Public Programmes at Tate Britain (2005-11) during which time she was involved in the creation of the Tate Research Department and secured Tate’s first major AHRC-funded project ‘Tate Encounters’ along with the museum’s first three collaborative doctoral awards. She is currently Director of the RCA’s major EU- MeLA funded project on ‘Curatorial and Artistic Research’, in collaboration with four European museums, and is Principal Investigator of a new RCA / Tate research project ‘Cultural Value and the Digital’.


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  • Cally Spooner, He's in a Great Place!, 2014. As part of BMW Tate Live: Performance Room, Tate Modern. Photo: Oliver Cowling for Tate Photography. Copyright Tate, London, 2014.
    1/4Cally Spooner, He's in a Great Place!, 2014. As part of BMW Tate Live: Performance Room, Tate Modern. Photo: Oliver Cowling for Tate Photography. Copyright Tate, London, 2014.
  • Art School: Another History. 6 May 2014. Elena Crippa, Catherine Elwes, Lisa Tickner and Amy Tobin.
    2/4Art School: Another History. 6 May 2014. Elena Crippa, Catherine Elwes, Lisa Tickner and Amy Tobin.
  • Museum Education and Public Programmes: From Object to Discourse. 13 May, 2014. Elena Crippa, Andrew Brighton and Victoria Walsh.
    3/4Museum Education and Public Programmes: From Object to Discourse. 13 May, 2014. Elena Crippa, Andrew Brighton and Victoria Walsh.
  • Aaron Angell, Misericord 1, 2014. Poster, napkins, 55 x 70 cm. Courtesy: the artist.
    4/4Aaron Angell, Misericord 1, 2014. Poster, napkins, 55 x 70 cm. Courtesy: the artist.